OceanicTime Archives

2021-04-09

LeJOUR Le Mans CHRONO

Gentlemen, start your engines! Hold those horses just a moment, folks – this lovely new heritage chronograph from LeJOUR - 

as its name implies has been inspired by the legendary Le Mans 24Hr Race which means we require a Le Mans-style start.

The Le Mans 24Hr race begins with the drivers outside of their vehicles; when the flag drops, they make a mad dash for their cars (parked on the other side of the track), jump in, start their engines, drive off and begin the race.

The Le Mans 24Hr is a race that is steeped in tradition, it dates back to 1923 – in contrast the new LeJOUR Le Mans Chrono while made using the latest Swiss watchmaking methods has a classic style that dates back to the 1960s – 

a time when names like Ford and Ferrari dominated at Le Mans with the likes of Olivier Gendebien, Phil Hill and legend, Bruce McLaren.

LeJOUR is a mark that was actually around during those days, so it seems only fitting that they have released this very cool Le Mans Chronograph evoking a bygone era when gentlemen racers were what every little boy dreamt of one day becoming (me included). Offered in eight different dial, sub-dial and bezel combos, the new Le Mans Chrono from LeJOUR has been realized in a 42mm Stainless Steel case accentuated with a mix of satin brushed finishing with chamfered high-polished edges giving the timepiece a sporty yet premium feel.

Staying true to its vintage roots, the Le Mans Chronograph has been topped with a domed Sapphire crystal. Meanwhile the dial below which has been deeply recessed, is offered in two different finishes: 

sunray or matte with 3 sub-dials finished with snailing (concentric pattern) and a day-date indicator at 3 o’clock.

And for a touch a of versatility, the Le Mans Chronograph comes in two styles of bracelets, four models with 3 link oyster style bracelets and the rest presented on an iconic Jubilee-style bracelet giving a distinctive appeal to each model.

The case-back design has always been an integral feature on the modern day LeJOUR watches; the Le Mans Chronograph is no different; 

it features a deeply stamped racecar and pit-stop motif. And while the watch is inspired by the racetrack, it is still water-resistant to 200m, thanks to a screw-down case-back and crown.

Finally like any racecar wishing to survive the rigors of time such as in the 24Hr Le Mans, the LeJOUR Le Mans Chronograph also has a reliable engine to power it; in this instance, a Swiss made ETA 7750 Automatic Chronograph movement. 

Thoughts? I’m not surprised to see ref. LJ-LM-001 already sold out; that would have been my choice with LJ-LM-007 a close second but would have loved to have seen British Racing green as an option. 

Follow the link HERE or the one embedded, below for more . . .

 https://www.lejourwatches.ch/

2021-04-08

PANERAI Submersible eLAB-ID [HI-TECH / HI-END DUMPSTER DIVER]

Innovating and guilt tripping its peers into creating high-tech watches with minimal environmental impact this is what Panerai’s Laboratorio di Idee has been working on for 2021; and the result is truly remarkable as it is eye-wateringly-expensive. You know how they say “one man's trash is another man's treasure”; well if ever there was an example of that proverb ringing true – this has to be it. With 98.6% of recycled-based material by weight Panerai’s new Submersible eLAB-IDTM watch is the epitome of sustainable watchmaking – or is it?

Not only does the watch AKA PAM01225 boast the highest percentage of recycled-based material ever made, but damn –it looks good enough to eat –well at least slap on your wrist and feel guilt free about its environmental impact. 

In fact such is the level of recyclability that this watch incorporates, it makes use of recycled materials that you probably weren’t even aware were even recyclable.

One example is its use of 100% recycled SuperLuminova™ on its dial and hands; obtained through a dedicated, small-scale recycling processes that reuses raw material waste. 

Then there’s the 100% recycled silicon for its movement escapement but for its case, sandwich dial and bridges –

these are all composed of EcoTitanium™, a recycled titanium alloy that is a lightweight, dolphin-friendly, aerospace-grade alloy consisting of more than 80% pure recycled content. 

From its Sapphire crystal to its gold hands, pretty much all of the watch’s key components contain some sort of recycled-based material.

Basic spec. includes: a 44mm, 300m water-resistant case in brushed EcoTitanium, an in-house automatic P.900e caliber with 3-days of autonomy and a textile strap with a rubber underside plus tone on tone stitching. Thoughts? I want to do my bit as much as the next guy; so it’s pretty cool to see watches like Panerai’s new Submersible eLAB-ID hitting the shelves albeit – just the 30 of them which btw will be available next year (2022)! I just wish that its 60’000USD price-tag could have had a similarly low impact as its manufacturing did on the planet because one thing’s for sure; someone had to pay the price for all this - lovely dolphin-hugging-tech and it’s invariably us (the punter), so for me if sustainability creates this level of unobtainability it’s a big fail.

We’ll have to keep f#cking up the planet just a bit longer at least until we can afford to save it the Panerai way – 

seriously just stop buying so many watches; hmm, it might be time to consolidate and get an X-Fathoms; you know for when the ice-caps have totally melted and were’ living in Kevin Reynolds’ dystopian vision of the future. 

But what do you think; this or a new car?

 

2021-04-07

TUDOR BLACK BAY FIFTY-EIGHT 18K

The 18K says it all – yes, folks – this year’s Black Bay Fifty-Eight duo, striking (nay stunning) as they both are; aren’t really fit for purpose. 

 

I guess Tudor felt that the current BB family which already includes 2020’s BB 58 NAVY BLUE is pretty much all you’ll ever need from their heritage diver’s collection and it is – 

only it isn’t because Tudor seemed to have overlooked the growing green watch trend and I don’t mean; tree hugging, polar bear friendly woke green – I mean good old fashioned green. Where is it?

  

And no, 18K Gold cases with green dials don’t count! Why no green steel? 

But seeing as you’re here let’s take a look this 18K and Green variant of Tudor’s most popular diver’s model the new Black Bay Fifty Eight 18K. 

  

For 2021 Tudor has introduced a bold new version of its popular model, the Black Bay Fifty-Eight, in 18 ct yellow gold with an open case back, a first for both in a Tudor divers’ model. 

 

Taking its name from the precious metal of its case as well as the year of its ancestor’s (Ref. 7924 AKA Big Crown) birth year, 1958, the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 18K divers' watch is waterproof to 200 meters. 

  

Presented in a case 39mm in diameter case, the watch is very much in keeping with the characteristic proportions of the 1950s. 

It is also the first Tudor divers’ watch to be made in 18 ct yellow gold and offered with an open case-back.

  

KEY POINTS 

1. Case with satin finish (matt), 39 mm in diameter, in 18 ct yellow gold with an open case back 

2. Dial matt "golden green" in tone, with applied hour markers in 18 ct yellow gold 

3. Manufacture Calibre MT5400, certified by the Swiss Official Chronometer Testing Institute (COSC) with a hairspring in silicon and a 70-hour power reserve 

4. “Snowflake” hands, one of the hallmarks of the TUDOR divers’ watches introduced in 1969, in 18 ct yellow gold, with grade A Swiss Super-LumiNova® luminescent material 

5. Two straps are included: green Jacquard fabric with gold band and dark brown alligator 

6. Five-year transferable guarantee, without registration or mandatory maintenance checks

  

Entirely satin-finished for a matt effect that may seem counter-intuitive with the traditional, bright finish typical of a gold watch, the case of the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 18K in 18 ct yellow gold is another first for a TUDOR divers' watch. 

  

An open case back, which reveals the new Manufacture MT5400 Calibre, has not been offered by the brand before for this type of product and reinforces the dual aesthetic language of this model. 

Midway between the legacy of a robust tool-watch that still defines TUDOR and a precious object, the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 18K remains as rare as it is exclusive. 

 

The matt 18 ct yellow gold of the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 18K is emphasised by the elegant combination of dial and bezel, which are a rich “golden green” in tone with matt gold details. 

 

The “Snowflake” hands are in 18 ct yellow gold, as are the appliqués of the hour markers. The same color palette is found on the fabric strap offered with this model. 

 

Thoughts? This would make so much more sense (at least to me) if it was in Al Bronze or even steel. It’s still a beauty, though. What do you think?

 

TUDOR BLACK BAY FIFTY-EIGHT 925

The 925 says it all – yes, folks – this year’s Black Bay Fifty-Eight duo, striking (nay stunning) as they both are; aren’t really fit for purpose.

I guess Tudor felt that the current BB family which already includes 2020’s BB 58 NAVY BLUE is pretty much all you’ll ever need from their heritage diver’s collection and it is – 

only it isn’t because Tudor seemed to have overlooked the growing green watch trend and I don’t mean; tree hugging, polar bear friendly woke green – I mean good old fashioned green. Where is it?

And no, 18K Gold cases with green dials don’t count! But seeing as you’re here let’s take a look this Silver and Taupe variant of Tudor’s most popular diver’s model the new Black Bay Fifty Eight 925. Tudor has launched a unique new version of its popular Black Bay Fifty-Eight model in 925 silver with an open case back – two firsts for a Tudor divers' model. Taking its name from the semi-precious metal of its case as well as the year of its ancestor’s (Ref. 7924 AKA Big Crown) birth year, 1958, the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 925 divers' watch is waterproof to 200 metres. Presented in a case 39mm in diameter case, the watch is very much in keeping with the characteristic proportions of the 1950s. It is also the first Tudor divers’ watch to be made in 925 Silver and offered with an open case-back.

KEY POINTS 

1. Case with satin finish (matt), 39 mm in diameter in 925 silver, with an incandescence and an open case back 

2. Domed dial, matt frosted taupe, with applied hour markers 

3. Manufacture Calibre MT5400, certified by the Swiss Official Chronometer Testing Institute (COSC) with a hairspring in silicon and a 70-hour power reserve 

4. “Snowflake” hands, one of the hallmarks of the TUDOR divers’ watches introduced in 1969, with grade A, Swiss Super-LumiNova® luminescent material 

5. A choice of two straps: taupe Jacquard fabric with silver band or brown grain leather 

6. Five-year transferable guarantee, without registration or mandatory maintenance checks.

The use of 925 silver is a first for a TUDOR divers' watch, and the composition of the chosen alloy is a secret that the brand keeps close to its chest. 

The properties of this alloy are such that use does not affect the appearance of the case of the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 925.

Entirely satin-finished for a matt effect, it possesses an unexpected incandescent brilliance, which can best be admired on the wrist. 

Its extraordinary texture lends a precious aura to this model, accentuated by its open case back, which enables an appreciation of its Manufacture MT5400 Caliber.

These choices reinforce the dual aesthetic language of this model, midway between the legacy of a robust tool-watch that still defines TUDOR and a precious object. 

The silver case of the Black Bay Fifty-Eight 925 is also accentuated by its dial, which is taupe in color, and its matching bezel insert.

Numerous silver details add the finishing touches to this model's delicate face, especially the famous "Snowflake" hands, one of TUDOR's hallmarks since 1969, as do the graduations and text. 

The same colour palette is found on the fabric strap offered with this model.

Thoughts? This would make so much more sense (at least to me) if it was in Stainless steel or even Titanium. It’s still a beauty, though. What do you think?

 

2021-04-06

CERTINA DS Action GMT SE in Pepsi

Certina’s tough travel / diving companion, the DS Action GMT gets a tasty new look for 2021 with the release of this good looking Pepsi flavored Special Edition AKA ref. Ref. C032.429.18.041.00. 

The watch gets a Navy Blue dial and blue/red 24HR / dive-time scale for its inner rotational bezel, which all work harmoniously with the red elements on the dial such as from the text and hands.

Meanwhile its 200m water-resistant, Stainless steel case which measures 43mm in diameter is presented on a Navy Blue NATO. 

Otherwise its business as usual with its automatic movement, the POWERMATIC 80.661 which boasts 80hrs of autonomy and a date which can be found at 3HR.

This will surely be welcomed by all Cola fans as the DS Action GMT family which includes 2x PVD variants and this one’s Coke flavored brother now has added imo its best looking model to date. 

And because it has an MSRP in Switzerland of 880CHF it is also the least expensive model in the collection – not by much though. 

But what do you think? 

 https://www.certina.com/

2021-04-02

RADO Captain Cook CERAMIC

The Rado Captain Cook heritage diver’s watch has never looked so: a) awesome c) confused? You be the judge . . . RADO’s classic vintage diver; the Captain Cook which can trace its lineage back to the 1960s has been launched into the 21st Century with a high-tech Monobloc-constructed, ceramic case as well as modern power-train that has been equipped with a cutting-edge Nivachron™ hairspring. The 1960s dramatically collides with the 2020s in this quite unexpected new offering from Rado who say that this (the Captain Cook Ceramic), their newest addition to the Captain Cook family is “the culmination of many years of research and development”. The watch boasts some of the brand’s most shining technical achievements such as its innovative high-tech ceramic Monobloc case construction. This has been made from a scratch-resistant, hypoallergenic, high-tech ceramic and houses another Rado marvel, the Caliber R734 which features a Nivachron™ hairspring. The innovative Nivachron™ hairspring provides an advantage in everyday life by protecting the watch (in particular its mechanical movement) from magnetic fields thus illuminating the necessity for a Faraday-cage. The Captain Cook Ceramic is presented for the first time in a case size of 43mm in diameter, and comes in flavors. The first of which is with a black ceramic case and bracelet with a hardened Stainless steel turning bezel with a black ceramic inlay. The second model has the same case and dial but is offered with a rubber strap for those who prefer a sportier aesthetic. The third variant is offered similarly with a black ceramic case and bracelet but with a contrasting Rose Gold colored PVD coated Stainless steel turning bezel, also with a black ceramic insert. The fourth model has a highly distinct plasma ceramic case and bracelet, also with hardened Stainless steel bezel with a blue ceramic insert. All four references are powered by the Rado Caliber R734 with its powerful autonomy of up to 80 hours; they are all water-resistant to 300 meters. Meanwhile Rado’s high-tech play on the Captain Cook carries over to the dial and case-back which have been crafted from black tinted Sapphire crystal affording the wearer front and back views of the inner-workings of the skeletonized R734. Despite the watch’s obvious contemporary styling and open work dial – it has remained faithful to those classic diver’s watches with the inclusion of the CC family’s signature chunky arrow-handset as well as large bold applied markers which have all been filled along with the bezel’s 12hr triangular marker - with white Super-LumiNova. The impressive Sapphire dial is also home to the iconic Rado rotating anchor at 12 o’clock, and is protected by a chevé box Sapphire crystal as one final nod to the watch’s past.

Thoughts? Yup, it’s all rather impressive as it is busy. 

With that said; I would imagine that the watch is super light and comfortable to wear and as far as diving is concerned once the dial heads into low-light, its dial should be perfectly legible.

But what do you think? What was your answer to the question above?